Bake Club: Scones

A couple of years ago I received a jar of flour, sugar, baking powder and freeze dried raspberries as a gift. I made them and thought freeze dried raspberries are the greatest thing ever. I still think highly of them, but the greatest thing ever is actually the magic of buttermilk. I tried to recreate this scone recipe several times and each time it was good. Once it even tasted just like that jar of scone mix. Recently, I decided to make them again, except I decided to use buttermilk, because I had it in the fridge and I like how fluffy it makes cake and biscuits. I accidentally made the best scones ever.

When you bake with buttermilk, you need to add baking powder so it has something to react to. I found if I use 1 cup of flour, then I need 1 tsp of baking powder. If I use 1 1/2 cups of flour I need 1 1/2 tsp of baking powder – see where I am going here? Baking soda reacts immediately with the buttermilk causing the dough to rise and baking powder gives the dough lift and keeps it elevated or a slow continued rise with the heat. These two ingredients are key to a fluffy scone.

I bet you are wondering the difference between a scone and a biscuit? A scone has egg in it. It also tends to be drier and needs support from fruit, jam and nuts, or other flavourings like herbs and onions. Scones tend to be a bit denser, something I like with tea for breakfast or as an afternoon snack to help me last until dinner.

Messing around with proportions I think I came up with a version I really like. It was soft and luscious and perfect for breakfast. This recipe is not sweet. If you like a sweeter bread, add an additional 1/2 cup of sugar. If you need more sweetness, think about jam or honey as a condiment, or make a compound butter. Honey butter is nice.

I sifted together 2 1/2 cups of all purpose flour, 2 tbsp of granulated sugar, 2 1/2 tsp of baking powder and 1/2 tsp of baking soda. You could use bread flour but I never have it in the house. Give it a good whisk before adding 1/2 cup of cubed butter. It should be cold but honestly, I never have cold butter. Butter as it melts in the oven creates pockets of steam that add to the flakiness. If you are quick and gentle, room temp is fine.

I tossed the butter pieces into the flour to coat them well. Then I use my thumb and two fingers in a circular rubbing motion to work the butter into the flour until the butter is pea sized. Using a pastry cutter does the same thing. I read once using two knives works too…. two knives? Just get your hands dirty. That is what they are for. Then you get a feel for you baking and you know when to stop.

After the butter is worked in you can stick it in the freezer for about 10 minutes if you wish. I don’t because I think it’s fine. I am not trying to win the GBBO. At this point I add an egg to 1 cup of butter milk and whisk them together. Making a well in the center of the flour, I pour the buttermilk egg mixture in. With a fork, I pull the flour into the center getting everything moist and incorporated.

I added fresh raspberries that had seen better days and a cup of freezed dried raspberries, the last of my visit from Trader Joe’s. You can add anything you like here, nuts and apples, blue berries or rum soaked raisins. The choice is yours and do what you like, but don’t go over 1 1/2 cups of extras because the dough won’t be able to hold it together – chocolate and banana would be nice too!

Gently fold everything together. Now the tricky part. This is a wet dough. Prep a baking sheet with parchment or a silpat lined tray. Four your hands! I did this on a cutting board and regretted it. Do it on the baking sheet. Pat the dough into a large circle about an inch thick. Cut and separate the wedges.

Brush with butter milk and sprinkle sugar over top. I used granulated sugar but any will do. If you dust with icing sugar, wait until they come out of the oven.

Bake for 20 minutes at 400F. I prefer them the next day but some of my family like them warm out of the oven. I freeze these and pull them out as I need them. If you try them, let me know what you think!

They aren’t pretty but they are delicious.

Bake Club: These are not kiddie cookies

I am starting to develop my own baking recipes and adding them to my vintage cookbook if they pass the family. If they like it and want it again, it passes, if they don’t – total fail and it is left out. I cleaned up the pantry and needed to do something with some raw pecans and hard raisins.

I liberated a bottle of spiced rum from my son and poured about 1/8 cup over the rest of the raisins, 1/2 cup. I let the raisins soak for about an hour. It smelled so good.

I melted 1/4 cup of salted butter in a sauce pan and added the rest of my raw pecans. I let the butter foam and I watch it closely because I didn’t want it to burn. It took about 2 minutes on medium heat. Make sure you remove it once you can smell roasty toasty nuts. I poured everything through a sieve and reserved the butter.

Preheat your oven to 350F I whisked together 1 cup of flour, 1/2 tsp sea salt, 1/2 tsp baking soda, 1/2 tsp ground cinnamon, 1/8 tsp nutmeg. I then added 2 cups of quick oats. Whisked it together and set it aside.

Pull out your mixer either a stand or hand beaters because you need to whipped the butter and sugars until it looks like frosting. Cream together the reserved 1/4 of browned butter – it has a pecan flavour and smells fantastic. (scrape in those brown solid bits because it adds the best flavour) Add 1/2 cup of salted butter – room temperature, 3/4 cup of packed brown sugar, 1/4 cup white sugar, 1 egg , 2 tsp vanilla, 2 Tbsp of maple syrup (the real stuff. If you don’t have it, leave out the fake and carry on) Mix this until it is light and fluffy, about 4-5 minutes.

Add the flour and mix until almost combined. Add the plumped raisins (I didn’t drain the rum, I added it to the cookie batter – because RUM IS DELICIOUS!) and the buttered pecans. Combine and let it sit for 5 minutes to let the flour hydrate. This makes a huge difference. Take the time.

On a parchment lined or silpat lined baking sheet, drop 1/4 cup or a ice cream scoop of batter on the sheet. My tray holds 6 scoops nicely. Bake for 15 minutes at 350F.

They taste best warm out of the oven, or room temperature or frozen. These are good and yes there is a rum flavour to them. The alcohol bakes off so you don’t need to worry if that is something that concerns you. There is alcohol in vanilla too – that bakes off and you don’t seem to mind that so please refrain from harassing me about alcohol. I like it, now you know.

If you do give the a try, let me know what you think!

Rum Raisin Oatmeal Cookies with Butter Pecans

  • 2 cups quick oats
  • 1 cup of All Purpose Flour
  • 1/2 tsp sea salt
  • 1/2 tsp baking soda
  • 1/2 tsp ground cinnamon
  • 1/8 tsp nutmeg
  • 1/4 browned butter
  • 1/2 cup salted butter
  • 3/4 cup brown sugar, packed
  • 1/4 cup white granulated sugar
  • 1 large egg
  • 2 Tbsp maple syrup
  • 2 tsp pure vanilla extract
  • 1/8 cup spiced rum
  • 1/2 cup of raisins
  • 1 cup of raw pecans

Freestyle baking

I spent the week (when I wasn’t at work) processing my harvest. There is something very satisfying about seeing bags of fruit and vegetables flat packed in my freezer. Everything was orderly in my fridge freezer and that inspired me to tackle the pantry.

I have a walk-thru pantry. It was the number one reason I bought this house. Number two reason was more than one bathroom and number three reason was the view. Maybe reason number one was the view…whatever.

While in pantry, I found at least a quarter tonnne of David’s Tea, several jars of nuts and a packet of freeze dried raspberries from Trader Joe’s. We don’t have TJ’s here in Canada so that was from my last trip to the USA in May 2019. I repacked the tea and found a better location for it, I sorted the baking items and spices so I had a good idea of what I had and what I needed to replenish. I put the items I needed to use up on my counter. Plus I had some raisins that were a little on the hard side. Can someone please tell me why I have two Costco size jars of cinnamon in my pantry, bags of cinnamon from the Bulk Barn and one glass jar of cinnamon. I don’t even like cinnamon. That honour belongs to my family. They are all about apple pie and cinnamon, cinnamon buns and cookies with cinnamon. I like cardamom. Not the same but similar. No I don’t like all the pumpkin flavoured things out right now. They don’t taste like pumpkin, they taste like cinnamon and nutmeg. I love pumpkin. It tastes like squash because it is squash.

I looked at these things and came up with a plan. I pulled the spiced rum from the liquor shelf and soaked the raisins for about an hour. I took the raw pecans leftover from my birthday cake and deep fried them in browned butter. I would add these to my oatmeal cookie recipe that I love.

I found some nearly expired raspberries in the fridge. They were at the ugly stage where you cook with them and refrain from adding them as a yogurt topping. I added those to the freeze dried raspberries and decided to use up the buttermilk I had and make raspberry scones. I wanted to recreate a dry jar I received as a gift from my son’s girlfriend. One of those jars where you add the dry ingredients to some butter and milk then bake. Those scones were amazing.

Then I had 6lbs of apples that I picked yesterday after work and needed to process them them. So my daughter and I sat, peeled and chopped those, laid them out on a tray and now they are freezing before I bag them. There is nothing that frustrated me more than a bag of fruit that is frozen together in one giant lump. It’s nearly impossible to do anything useful with a brick of macerated fruit or veg. I packed up the scones and tried to freeze them in my fridge freezer. Nope, that was full of rhubarb, carrots, beans, zucchini, green onions and now trays of apples. I went to my deep freezer in my pantry and yikes. Nothing was going in there, so I cleaned that out too. There was expired things int there from 2017. Maybe older. I tossed that and discovered I need to buy meat. I have one steak and some stew meat. I am good for vegetables and fruit from smoothies though! I even have frozen cubed coconut.

The scones went in the freezer along side Grandma’s date squares. The rum raisin oatmeal cookies went in the cookie jar. The daughter made an apple pie that is in the fridge. Baking has gone from a stress reliever to a creative outlet for me. I am developing my own recipes from techniques I learned this spring. I was always a cooking freestyler and rarely follow a recipe for meals. Now my creativity is flying high with baked goods. Later this week I will share my new recipes because they were delicious.

Dang I am tired. I had a full day and should sleep well tonight. Hopefully… sleep has been elusive but now that my kitchen is decluttered, perhaps I will sleep well one again.

Stay healthy everyone!

Bake Club: Grandma’s Squares

Last week I told you about the recipe my aunty gave me. The date square that my grandma used to make. I made it Saturday and it tastes EXACTLY like I remember it. which is a giant relief. It is so disappointing when things from your childhood aren’t like you remember. I tried the square at room temperature and honestly, I prefer them frozen, so I cut them into small pieces and stuffed them into my full and nearly bursting freezer.

The first thing I did was preheat my oven to 350F and chop a pound of dates.

I pulled out the vintage Pyrex bowls from my parent’s wedding gift stash and I creamed together 1 cup of granulated white sugar and 3 tbsp of salted butter. I did this by hand because I remember my grandma doing it that way. I added 3 egg yolks one at a time, beating in between the addition of each yolk.

I added the pound of chopped dates and 1 cup of chopped pecans. Stirring this was hard. I remember Grandma’s hands shaking and thinking she was weak. Sorry Gran, I take that back. It was hard.

I sifted together 1 cup of unbleached AP flour, 1 tsp of baking powder, and 1/4 tsp of salt. I then added it to the mix and stirred it up.

Then I whipped up the egg whites and vanilla until it reached ‘stiff peak’ stage.

I tried to be gentle when folding them in, but honestly, it was hard, so they were forced into the mix. Do what you can, I won’t judge.

It said to pour into a shallow greased pan. It didn’t say what size, but I found a 9 x 13 was the perfect size. I used the back of a measuring cup to smash it down, it wasn’t pourable or spreadable.

I baked it for 25 minutes and it turned out perfectly. The instructions say and I quote “DO NOT OVER BAKE” So I didn’t.

At this point you could cut it up, sprinkling icing sugar over it or leave as is because of the dates, it is very sweet. But not my grandma…. she would make pink buttercream frosting. I think it was intended to be red for Christmas and it would end up being hot pink. I am not okay with food dye but I made an exception this time. Only I made a soft pink frosting by creaming together 1/2 cup of salted butter, 2 cups of icing sugar and 3 tsp of cream.

I am surprised I loved these as a kid with all the dates and nuts. But the hook for me was the frosting. I love the stuff. In hindsight, it kind of tasted like butter tarts, Canada’s favourite sweet. I followed the recipe the way I remember helping Grandma do it. Right down to the beater. I didn’t offer it up to anyone because it was my job to lick it clean.

I did it right Grandma! It tasted they way it was supposed to – better frozen and I did my job. Love you and miss you. Thanks for the squares.

Vintage Recipes

June 1917 Good Housekeeping Magazine Cover

I am OBSESSED with vintage cookbooks and recipes. YouTube has a great selection of cooks trying out these recipes. My favourite part is the lack of direction. There is an assumption of the recipe that you know your way around the kitchen so you don’t need to be insulted by overly complicated directions. I find it hilarious when the host is making something and says ‘huh…I guess we are making the cheese!’ Then they proceed to make cheese from scratch because the recipe called for it.

My favourite recipes are from an era that I think my grandmothers may have tried. Somewhere around 1940 – 1949 because it predates Crisco salads or soup casseroles and the focus is on baking. There is a great selection of cookbooks from communities and flour companies in Canada, more specifically, Five Roses Flour and Robin Hood Flour. I remember my grandma looking at the Robin Hood cookbook, pulling a chair to the counter for me to stand on so I could ‘help’. My job consisted of dumping pre-measured ingredients into the mixing bowl and being the official taster. I am sure this is how I became a baker with my mom, grandmas and aunties letting me help. I did the same with my kids, nieces and nephews. Even now, my son needs to be the official batter taster and beater licker, he is 24.

Last night while I was watching the Eco Challenge, I was reminded of a square my grandmother used to make. <the name of this recipe is inherently racist, so I don’t want to use it, and I am changing the name to Grandma’s squares for my family’s reference but will footnote the history> I messaged my aunties and one looked in her Watkins 1943 cookbook – nope. My other aunty had it in her recipe collection because she still makes it. SCORE! I used to sneak into the freezer and steal a square. I thought they were best frozen. Grandma always frosted them with a bright pink buttercream.

I did a little research and discovered the recipe origin is from 1917 Good Housekeeping. < CT warning: If you click on the link to get the recipe, you will see the racial slur.> My Grandmother wasn’t born yet but her mother would have been 28. Conceivably, that is how my grandmother came by the recipe or it could have been reprinted in a later version of Good Housekeeping or in a Catholic Women’s League cookbook. I am very happy to have this in my family recipe collection.

I started a recipe book this summer. It is a collection of family favourite recipes that I make. The intent is to not lose recipes the our family loves and a reference for my kids for when they have their own families or even just want to make comfort food for themselves. When I began this project, my son loved the idea and gave me a list of recipes that are his favourite. Honestly, I didn’t even consider adding some of the food he wanted. His list included pizza crust, Yorkshire pudding, chocolate chip cookies and the rolls I make at Christmas. These are recipes that I make without thinking and it didn’t occur to me I needed to add them. The hubs sourced his mom’s infamous pickled onion recipe we both thought needed to be written down. My mom makes the best scrambled eggs that my daughter can recreate, her brother wanted that recipe. We need to get her oatmeal cookie, magic bar and leftover turkey casserole recipes too. I am also collecting recipes from my grandmothers that I loved like Lassie Coos – the family name for soft sparkly ginger cookies or GP’s turkey soup. Thinking about future generations trying these recipes and reading them in my handwriting is an important part of this. As I think of a recipe to include, I add it to the index with page number. I find myself flipping through this book because everything is in one place rather that the copious amount of cook books or random slips of paper I have.

I am sure as time moves forward I will remember other recipes I need to add, like mom’s turkey gravy, her baked ham and her sister’s scalloped potatoes. I like to think of this as the never completed family recipe book. I have to say, this has been one of the more meaningful projects I have worked on during the pandemic. What are some of you family favourites? Maybe you should send them to me so I can try them out here and share them with this community. I think this weekend I am giving Grandma’s Squares a bake – I will report back to see if they are as good as I remember.

Bake Club: Cornflake Chocolate Chip Cookie

I joined Christina Tosi’s Bake Club. I decided to try her famous Cornflake Chocolate Marshmallow cookies right out of the gate. I read her recipe and watched her do this on a lot of different videos. I used this recipe. In theory and in taste it is the perfect cookie. I made it. I read the reviews and learned there is something not right about the recipe because it couldn’t possibly be my skills. It was everyone else that was a terrible baker…not me. I will get to that, but first, let’s go through the process (no matter how disastrous the end result was for me).

Step one: Make the Cornflake Crunch (Warning: this stuff should be called crack. It is addicting.)

I made this the day before because it needs to be at room temperature before you use it. I crushed cornflakes and added powdered milk, sugar, salt and melted butter. I tossed them together and spread it out on a silpat lined baking sheet and baked it for 20 minutes.

It tasted familiar but also like nothing I have eaten before. After it cooled I stored it in an air-tight container.

Dang it was good. I would be happy snacking on this. Forget carrot sticks….

The next morning, I began the mixing of the cookie batter because it needed to chill for a while. The reviews said to freeze it, but I trusted Christina and only chilled them in the fridge.

THIS WAS MISTAKE NUMBER ONE.

The first part of the instructions call for beating the life out of the butter, sugar and eggs for 10 minutes. TEN MINUTES! So I did.

This stuff was so light and fluffy you could make clouds with it.

Then I needed to add the flour and mix until almost combined – that took less than one minute. Next add the Cornflake Crunch, marshmallows and mini chocolate chips.

Simple enough. I took my large cookie scoop as instructed and scooped out tightly packed balls of dough and lined them up on a sheet pan to chill a minimum of 30 minutes. I chilled them for four hours because I had errands to run.

The batter made enough for 24 balls. EXACTLY 24 balls. I had weighed the ingredients for precision and was very impressed. The dough tasted promising, like the cookie would be delicious!

The recipe directed me to bake for 18 minutes in a 375F oven.

THIS WAS MISTAKE NUMBER TWO

This yielded flat lacy dark brown cookies. nothing like the cookies in the picture. Luckily it was only six. I shortened the time to 13 minutes and it was a bit better. Then finally to 10 minutes and they were lighter in colour but still really spread out. Super crispy on the outside. Just like the reviews said it would be.

I think the oven was too hot. They taste good, but super greasy and not cookie like at all. I was so disappointed. I had high hopes and wanted this to be a successful return to baking. Now I have a box of toffee with cookie crumbs instead of cookies.

They look nothing like Tosi’s, so my inclination is to say lower the temperature of the oven to 300F or even 350F and bake for 10 minutes then check them. I am not sure if I will try again unless I find the recipe from her cookbook.

I will give bake club another try. I think I will make birthday cake next. It is grandpa’s birthday tomorrow, he would have been 97 and he hated cake. So if it turns out terrible, he won’t mind.

Stress Baking: Green Onion Cakes

There is a food here in Edmonton that locals go wild for. We stand in line at every festival waiting for a hot green onion cake to be served to use with a side of chile sauce and black vinegar. Edmontonians have a rabid obsession with these flakey hot disks of deliciousness. I don’t know if you have heard, but summer was cancelled by our Chief Medical Officer. I will miss the green onion cake truck so I decided to make my own.

I am learning that most people call these scallion pancakes… what?? Not in Edmonton. There is even a shop by the dude who brought them to Edmonton called The Green Onion Cake Man, so that is the proper name when you visit here. I was flipping through Instagram and saw a sponsored post by Robin Hood Flour to make these. I looked through the recipe and those that was easy enough. I had all the ingredients so why not? The recipe wasn’t as easy to follow because a online content specialist developed the format and not someone who follows recipes. I had to flip back and forth for measurements so I am sure there is an easier recipe out there, but this one is very delicious.

I made the shaggy dough. The number one most important step is to add boiling water. This will hydrate the flour to make it easy for rolling paper thin.

Then I chopped the green onions (scallions for you non-Edmontonians) and tossed it with the sesame oil and flour – this was different from the recipe but I have watched Green Onion Man make it this way. The recipe says to just combine flour and oil, I combined all three. Let the dough rest for 30 minutes. It needs time for the gluten to develop and rest. Divide the dough into four parts. I weighed them to make it even and fair.

I rolled the dough into a 8″ circle, and spread 1/4 of the onion paste onto the disk. Then I rolled it tightly into a tube – cinnamon bun style.

There were zero pictures in this recipe so I watched a video to get the hang of it. (Not all online marketing content writers are good at explaining things- I’m judgey because this is my industry).

Then you are supposed to spiral it – thusly:

How cute is that little snail-like bundle?

Now roll the living daylights out of it – the first one was terrible – let it rest about 5 minutes before rolling.

Then I popped it into a hot pan and fried them about 2 minutes a side with a lid – the lid helps these beauties rise and show off their flaky innards.

My pan was too hot so I suggest 3-4 minutes on medium, not medium high.

These did not last longer than 30 seconds. I recomend not using too much of the whit becuase they cut through the dough. Just use the greens. I saved a couple onions to regrow because I jumped on that bandwagon too. I plan to grow a few more because so many things taste nice with fresh sprigs of the green tops.

It takes about 8 days of changing the water everyday until you have enough to harvest. These little guys are four days old and grew one inch yesterday.

What projects are you working on this week? Let me know! I am looking for more inspiration. I am making butter tarts this week for the daughter’s birthday and planning out my garden. I am beginning to feel a lot like Laura Ingalls or Anne Shirley.

Stay healthy friends!

Basically: Galette Fail but Pizza Wins

This week’s recipe was the Triple Treat Onion Galette. A onion and garlic pie if you will. I know promised to follow the recipe exactly as shown but I didn’t. I didn’t have onions or garlic or scallions. Flour has become a precious commodity and making something my garlic allergy daughter can’t eat and son won’t eat seemed like a waste of flour. So I made pizza dough. It is galette shaped. And that is all I have to say about that. When I had high tea at the Grand Floridian eons ago, I had an onion tart that was delicious. It was a savoury jamy tart and I quite liked it. I imagine this gallet would be similar but on a larger scale. So maybe one day I will make it when I have an abundance of supplies, but for now, I am not risking it.

Instead we decided we wanted pizza and by we I mean my adult children, more specifically, my son. This was where I would spend my precious flour.

I normally make pizza by pouring in a bottle of beer instead of yeast. It is an easy way to get a rise and is quick. We don’t have any beer left and the liquor stores are closed so I made pizza crust the old fashion way, with yeast. I searched the Bon Appétit website searching for BA’s best pizza dough but found this one instead. I had all the ingredients, I read through the instructions and it said I could make the night before and keep it in the fridge. Perfect! That way we could have pizza for family movie night, a long ago tradition we had when the kids were younger. We would make homemade pizza watch a movie, have half-time (a tradition that dates back to family night movies with my dad. At the half-way mark, he would pause the movie, we would get snacks, do any business we needed to and then settle back into the movie, something I continued with my kids. They got to pick their treat, usually root beer and cream soda, popcorn or chips, smarties and reese peanut butter cups.)

The pizza dough was easy especially since I have been watching copious amounts of bread dough videos. Shout Out to Everyday Food, Oh Yum, Preppy Kitchen and my beloved Bon Appétit! I learned that my Kitchen Aid will knead the dough….wait…I have been kneading my bread by hand forever. I rarely used my dough hook before and now I know how to use it properly.

The dough was so lovely it brought a tear to my eye.

This is the recipe from Bon Appétit.

After the dough is mixed and is a shaggy ball, begin kneading. Normally I did this by hand to feel the dough, but the dough hook gives me a better result. It takes about 10 minutes of kneading with the dough hook and gradually adding flour about a tablespoon at a time until the dough climbs up the hook and is tacky, not sticky. This was the loveliest kneaded bread I have ever produced.

I stuck it in the fridge over night and it doubled in size. Normally I would prove it for an hour in the warming oven or a warm spot.

I split the dough in half and formed a circle with my hands, just like they do at Panago Pizza. I made the circle too big, next time I will measure. I preheated my pizza stones and placed the dough on the hot stone. I moved quickly to add the sauce toppings and cheese. Baked it for about 10 minute snad then rotated top for bottom to get even browning.

My kids said, and one is a pizza tasting expert, “this was the best crust they ever had”.

Now I just need to perfect the sauce.

What are you guys stress baking this week?

Basically: Carrot Cake

Everyone loves carrot cake but me. To me it is oily and I hate cream cheese frosting. Some how people think I love it and it ends up being my birthday cake more often than not. Thinking about it, I don’t really like cake. It tends not to be flavourful and fake frosting is the worst. Then this challenge happened and I found a cake that it delicious.

This week’s Basically recipe is Cardamom Pistachio Carrot Cake. I could eat this every day and it would STILL be my favourite. The recipe was not complicated but it was specific, so no winging it. When I saw the ingredients I was a little bit worried because things are not always easy to get during this time of isolation. I have all the ingredients except cardamom, pistachios, and carrot juice. I watched Sohla El_Waylly‘s instagram story and she didn’t have all the ingredients either because working from home is tricky. I knew I could make my own carrot juice if I couldn’t find any. But you know what? Sobey’s had it. Who knew you could buy carrot juice?? I bought cardamom and raw pistachios at Bulk Barn, $13!!!!! My first thought was, one cup of pistachios better be worth it. (Spoilers* it was!)

I weigh everything now. The results have made everything better. Not just a little bit better but next level “I should get my own show” better.

This is what $13 looks like. It wasn’t even a full cup!!! But… and I mean BUT… Tasting these beauties in brown butter was next level. It infused the butter and made the flavour next level.

I am a pro at brown butter now, just as the foam goes golden, remove it. The milk solids will toast up off the heat.

Pistachio browned butter has a green hue to it.

I whisked the dry ingredients together, forgot to add the spices. Why? I don’t know. I added them at then end and it turned out fine. In went the eggs, then the butter. This was the important part. Slowly drizzle the butter into the sugar mixture. It made it fluffy like marshmallow fluff. This is the key to a non-greasy carrot cake. Who knew? (Apparently Sohla and Basically did).

This took a few long minutes but it was a lovely result!

Then I folded in the carrots and nuts and put it into a 8” pan. I didn’t have a 9” so I needed to adjust the time. More on that later.

I was skeptical. Then I tasted that batter. I would have been fine just eating it like pudding or ice cream… omg turn this into ICE CREAM!!!!

I baked it for 55 minutes and looked at it. The centre was not rising. Sohla said that means it isn’t done, so I baked it for another 10 minutes. Still not done, so I baked it for another 5 and athoner 5. Then I was worried it would burn so I took it out even with the centre indented, but the tester came out clean so at least it was cooked.

I needed a cooled cake to put the glaze on so I left it overnight and made the glaze the next day. The glaze was an ordeal but now that I know what I am doing, the next time will be a snap.

First off, my pot was too big. So I dumped it into a smaller pot. This was my first mistake. She said to use a small pot and dump your ingredients in, don’t stir and watch it boil. She promised it wouldn’t boil over. Sohla was a liar pants. It boiled over in a small-ish pan.

It was a mess and the smell of burnt sugar on my stove was terrible. I then waited – as instructed- for the bubbles to subside. I was skeptical but it did happen.

I reduced it for a few minutes, tested it on a cold plate and then set aside to cool. Here was disaster number two. When I stuck my finger in it I burned myself because this is molten candy. I let it cool too long then it became solid candy. I now know 5 minutes is the sweet spot. You are welcome.

I poured it over the cake. it is kind of like those mirror glazes. It sorts itself out when you have the temperature right.

The end result? The best fricken cake I have ever eaten. I am making this for my birthday because I am worth it. I am making it for desserts when I go to a dinner party and I am going to make it just to snack on.

So, how did I do? This is theirs.

Mine – I need better food lighting.

I’d say close but not perfect. I have 48 birthdays to practice so I will have nailed by then.

Are you stress baking too? Let me know what you are making and drop a few pictures! Stay healthy friends!